Reading Genesis #Bible365

A post from the Big Bible popped up in my Twitter feed the other day, I opened the link and found a great reminder why some of us are working through the Bible:

Last November for the second time our Methodist Circuit followed a month long Bible Reading plan. This was a follow-up to a popular challenge the year before to read the whole New Testament in 30 days. This time the plan led people to read the whole of Genesis and Exodus plus 1 Psalm a day during November.

During the reading challenge we arranged small group sessions for people to discuss progress and explore any issues raised by what they had been reading.Looking back on the experience has led me to reflect on the dangers of the way I have grown up reading Genesis.

Stories from Genesis tend to be popular with Sunday Schools and in Children’s Bibles. I suspect that Genesis gets a far greater share of time than would be expected if it were allocated according to it’s length. The reason is probably a combination of coming first and the great stories in there (Creation, Noah and Joseph being good examples).

I have noticed in my reflections and in discussions on line that:

Firstly, many of us don’t have a very full picture of how the various stories that we have grown up with fit together. Or of the whole of the life of the various heroes of faith.

Secondly, our understanding of Genesis is typically built up from a very selective reading of Genesis.We read (or are told and remember) stories of great heroes of the faith, of amazing things by God. However, we don’t share, teach or often read the bits in between or how they connect together.

This means that often our understanding of Genesis and the way we apply it is based on only a small part of the text, typically taken out of context. Essentially, we have created a canon within a canon (a smaller bible created by ignoring some parts).

I want to suggest that this is dangerous, it can lead us astray.

Read the rest of the article by @Dave42W over at bigbible.org.uk.

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