Hurricanes: Christian, and Less Christian Responses

American Christian Actor, Kirk Cameron commented a little about the hurricanes that have battered America recently.

In a Facebook video, that got seen at least 750,000 times, Kirk Cameron commented in regards to Hurricane Irma:

“How should we look at two giant hurricanes coming back to back like this? Do we write them off as coincidence? Do we write it off as a statistical anomaly? Wow! Who would’ve thought? Is it just Mother Nature in a bad mood?”

Kirk then chooses a Bible verse that can be taken to suggest that the thinks that God “causes [storms] to happen for punishment, or to water his land to demonstrate his faithful love.”

Here’s the video:

Whatever he meant, I cant help he ends it basically saying “I’m outta here. Good Luck”

In case anyone out there is intrigued by what a Google for “christian response to hurricane” gets, I actually got these guys…

I don’t really know the American Family Association, but they seem to be planning on doing something to help.  And cant help but notice that not may people have viewed their video compared to this…

Personally. As far as explanations go, I quite this from BBC Newsnight.

 

Whats your favorite “bad weather explanation”?

Have you heard about the 7 priests walking into a bar?

It sounds like the start of a joke…

Admittingly the punchline needs some work…

Check this out from the bbc.co.uk website:

Pub bosses have apologised after asking a group of trainee priests to leave their Cardiff venue, mistaking them for a stag party in fancy dress.

The seven Roman Catholic seminarians had gone to The City Arms to toast Father Peter McClaren’s ordination when they were asked to move on.

But assistant manager Matt Morgan said they received a free round of drinks when the situation was explained.

“They were all dressed in their black and white clothes,” he said.

“The staff thought they were a stag. We do have quite a few issues on the weekends with parties wearing fancy dress so it is our policy to turn them away.”

There is a happy ending…

“The doorman basically said something along the lines of, ‘sorry gents, we have a policy of no fancy dress and no stag dos’.”

The students had started to leave when they were approached by the bar manager.

“He basically said, ‘you’re real, aren’t you?’,” said Fr Doyle.

“He invited them back in and when they walked back in the entire pub burst into a round of applause, and they had a free round off The City Arms.”

Read more on the BBC website.

I guess I have a few questions

Are groups of drunken priests wondering the local pubs an issue in your area?

Would you worry, if you saw a group of priests in your local pub?

Is there a difference between student priests and a stag party? 

A reminder that suicide and depression are not selfish

a reminder that suicide and depression are not selfish

After the sad news that Chester Bennington, lead singer of Linkin Park had committed suicide, I wanted to reshare a part of a Guardian article written after Robin Williams had taken his life:

Depression IS an illness

Depression, the clinical condition, could really use a different name. At present, the word “depressed” can be applied to both people who are a bit miserable and those with a genuine debilitating mood disorder. Ergo, it seems people are often very quick to dismiss depression as a minor, trivial concern. After all, everyone gets depressed now and again, don’t they? Don’t know why these people are complaining so much.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again; dismissing the concerns of a genuine depression sufferer on the grounds that you’ve been miserable and got over it is like dismissing the issues faced by someone who’s had to have their arm amputated because you once had a paper cut and it didn’t bother you. Depression is a genuine debilitating condition, and being in “a bit of a funk” isn’t. The fact that mental illness doesn’t receive the same sympathy/acknowledgement as physical illness is oftenreferenced, and it’s a valid point. If you haven’t had it, you don’t have the right to dismiss those who have/do. You may disagree, and that’s your prerogative, but there are decades’ worth of evidence saying you’re wrong.

Depression doesn’t discriminate

How, many seem to wonder, could someone with so much going for them, possibly feel depressed to the point of suicide? With all the money/fame/family/success they have, to be depressed makes no sense?

Admittedly, there’s a certain amount of logic to this. But, and this is important, depression (like all mental illnesses) typically doesn’t take personal factors into account. Mental illness can affect anyone. We’ve all heard of the “madness” of King George III; if mental illness won’t spare someone who, at the time, was one of the most powerful well-bred humans alive, why would it spare someone just because they have a film career?

Granted, those with worse lives are probably going to be exposed to the greater number of risk factors for depression, but that doesn’t mean those with reduced likelihood of exposure to hardships or tragic events are immune. Smoking may be a major cause of lung cancer, but non-smokers can end up with it. And a person’s lifestyle doesn’t automatically reduce their suffering. Depression doesn’t work like that. And even if it did, where’s the cut-off point? Who would we consider “too successful” to be ill?

Read the rest over at The Guardian website.

Has this whole matter hit home a little hard. Contact The Samaritans, or find someone else to talk to. Please.