Simpsons-Computer

10 reasons why you shouldn’t have a church website

Picture the scene. You’re there at church, and some bright spark turns around and suggests that you should have a church website. Instead of rejecting the idea completely, here are ten reasons why you should say no:

1. Someone would need to build it.
2. Why would people go to a church website, when they can just come to a Sunday Service?
3. Someone would need to update it.
4. We can’t ask the obvious people who always say yes to things to do another job!
5. We’ll need to arrange a committee to decide how it will look!
6. Don’t we need photos for something like that?
7. We’ll need to decide why we need a website.
8. We have a Facebook group, why do we need anything else?
9. Faith comes by hearing. In person. On a Sunday morning. Not via a MP3 recording!
10. Having a website may upset the person who puts together the church notice sheet.

Any more reasons to say no?

Facebook-Groups-For-Churchs

How Churches can use Facebook Groups.

Our church has recently been looking at its online communication, as such here’s a collection of thoughts about how to use a Facebook group for a church:

Probably best to get our heads around the difference between a Facebook page and a group. In the words of Facebook:

Pages allow real organizations, businesses, celebrities and brands to communicate broadly with people who like them. Pages may only be created and managed by official representatives.

Groups provide a closed space for small groups of people to communicate about shared interests. Groups can be created by anyone.

The suggestion being that a Facebook page is focused around news or content about an individual / organisation, while a Facebook Group can involve anyone starting conversations. In fact, if it helps think less of a Facebook Group, and think more of a forum where people meet and discuss maters relating to the groups chosen subject area. For example someone posting about a computer setup may not be welcome on a Knitters group.

Now, I’m aware that many churches have a Facebook Page, I may post some ideas about how to use Facebook pages one day, but for now here are a few ideas for Churches who have gone done the Facebook Group route.*

  1. Ask questions about church events, housegroup programmes, meetings, etc. Be prepared for negative feedback, and be prepared to just accept and not be defensive.
  2. Encourage conversation, encourage people to say what they think, encourage people to share links they feel other people in the church may enjoy.
  3. Fiec.org.uk suggests having a Facebook group for each group within the Church, so a group for youth leaders, worship groups, preachers etc. If you have one group, theres no reason why at least some conversations could be as part of a greater group.
  4. Just had an event at church? Get people to upload and share their photos!
  5. Work on shared documents together.
  6. Share Facebook events on the group – invite everyone on the group to the event!
  7. Ensure you have administrators to ensure that conversations remain civil, and any controversial topics are avoided . Get the group admins chatting on Facebook to each other to make sure you all “sing from the same hymn sheet”.
  8. If there are any controversial topics that people are banned from talking about, make sure that its clearly written on the group, so people have a chance of knowing about in advance!

Is there anything people would like to add?

*Personally I believe if you are to have one or the other, then you should have a Facebook Page, see churchmarketingsucks.com for a bit more information.